Bette Midler Criticizes Supreme Court with ‘Wizard of Oz’ Parody Song

 

Musical Protest Against Recent Decisions

On July 2, 2024, Bette Midler took to social media to release a parody of the ‘Wizard of Oz’ song ‘If I Only Had a Brain,’ targeting several Supreme Court Justices. The song, penned by Eric Kornfeld and directed by Marc Shaiman, sees Midler calling out Justices Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, and Brett Kavanaugh.

In the song, Midler sings, “You could judge women fairly / And have ethics more than barely / If you only had a brain,” and continues, “Neil and Brett, you spiteful judges / We gals are holding grudges / Keep church and state apart / You could be less disruptive, in all matters reproductive / If you only had a heart.” The song criticizes recent Supreme Court rulings and concludes with the lines, “Thumbs down to autocracy / We’re saving our democracy, so life can be divine.”

Political and Social Impact

Midler has a history of vocal political activism, especially concerning issues like reproductive rights. Her parody song is a direct response to what she perceives as a threat to democracy and women’s rights. Midler has previously criticized Supreme Court decisions, including the 2022 ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.

The backlash from her comments on social media about the ruling led her to clarify her stance, emphasizing that her message was not meant to be exclusionary or transphobic but rather about the ongoing struggles women face. She stated, “The truth is, Democracy is slipping through our fingers! I’m all in on trying to save Democracy for ALL PEOPLE. We must unite, because, in case you haven’t been paying attention, divided we will definitely fall.”

Call to Action

Midler’s song also includes a call to action for voters to support democracy by voting in the upcoming elections. Her social media post featuring the song was captioned, “Thumbs down to autocracy!! #VoteBlue2024ProtectDemocracy.” This message underscores her ongoing commitment to political advocacy and encouraging public participation in the democratic process.